POLICY SPEECH

POLICY SPEECH – OUTLINE TEMPLATE

In Support of a Policy

 

 

I               Introduction

  1. Pathos move – capture the attention of the audience by getting us to care about the issue to be introduced in the problem section
  2. Logos move – clarify the subject matter (problem), then state your thesis making sure it includes a clear identification of the bill and call to action (what want your audience to DO)

 

 
 

Transition : use a signpost to move from intro to body

 

II             Problem: Name the Problem

 

  1. Identify an aspect of the problem
    1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
    2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
    3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  2. Identify another aspect of the problem
    1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
    2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
    3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  3. Make a decision how much evidence to marshal in support of the problem. Keep in mind that the point is to build a solid case that there is a serious problem, while keeping the problems relative to what your bill does (how will it solve those problems)

 

Transition: review previous main point and preview upcoming main point

 

III            Solution: Declare that a solution exists by restating some form of the thesis and your call to action

 

  1. Tell us what the policy is in quick summary and who supports it

 

  1. Explain what the key elements of the policy are.
    1. Identify a key way the policy will solve the problem(s) identified above.
      1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
      2. Identify a key way the policy will solve the problem(s) identified above.
        1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
      3. Repeat until arguments for the policy-as-solution are addressed in full or as needed.

 

  1. Opposition / Rebuttal
    1. Shift gears and tell us who the opposition is (groups?) and what they’re saying (succinctly)
    2. Rebut their argument – with supporting evidence, not just your opinion

 

Transition: use a signpost to move from body to conclusion

 

 
 

IV            Conclusion

  1. Quick review of thesis (general problem and bill as solution)
  2. Restate your call to action – GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO TAKE THIS ACTION!
  3. Close memorably


POLICY SPEECH – OUTLINE TEMPLATE

Against a Policy

 

 

I               Introduction

A.            Pathos move – capture the attention of the audience by getting us to care about the issue to be                                  introduced in the problem section

B.            Logos move – clarify the subject matter (problem), then state your thesis declaring that a solution                             has been proposed (the bill) and your belief that it is inadequate, including your call to action (what do

you want your audience to DO).

 

Transition : use a signpost to move from intro to body (Ex: Does this mean there’s no problem? Absolutely not.)

 

II             Problem: Name the Problem

 

 
 
    1. Identify an aspect of the problem
  1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
  2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  4. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
  5. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  6. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
    1. Identify another aspect of the problem
    1.  Make a decision how much evidence to marshal in support of the problem. Keep in mind that the point is to build a solid case that there is a serious problem, while keeping the problems relative to what your bill does (how will it solve those problems)

 

Transition: review previous main point and preview upcoming main point

 

III            Solution: Declare that a solution has been proposed and restate your belief that it is inadequate and your call to action

 

  1. Brief summary what the key elements of the policy are who supports it
    1. Identify key way supporters of the policy believe it will solve the problem(s) identified above.
      1. Offer their supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  2. Brief summary of why this policy will not solve the identified problem(s) and who is against this policy-as-solution

1.     Identify key ways those against this policy-as-solution believe it will not solve the problem(s)                                        identified above.

a.     Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations,          examples, etc.

  1. Repeat until arguments for the policy-as-solution and policy-as-NOT-the-solution are addressed in full or as needed. (The majority of your time should be spent in the “B” section of part “III.”)

 

Transition: use a signpost to move from body to conclusion

 

IV            Conclusion

  1. Quick review of thesis (general problem and bill as NOT the expedient solution)
  2. Restate your call to action – GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO TAKE THIS ACTION!
  3. Close memorably

 

 
 

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POLICY SPEECH

POLICY SPEECH – OUTLINE TEMPLATE

In Support of a Policy

 

 

I               Introduction

  1. Pathos move – capture the attention of the audience by getting us to care about the issue to be introduced in the problem section
  2. Logos move – clarify the subject matter (problem), then state your thesis making sure it includes a clear identification of the bill and call to action (what want your audience to DO)

 

 
 

Transition : use a signpost to move from intro to body

 

II             Problem: Name the Problem

 

  1. Identify an aspect of the problem
    1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
    2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
    3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  2. Identify another aspect of the problem
    1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
    2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
    3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  3. Make a decision how much evidence to marshal in support of the problem. Keep in mind that the point is to build a solid case that there is a serious problem, while keeping the problems relative to what your bill does (how will it solve those problems)

 

Transition: review previous main point and preview upcoming main point

 

III            Solution: Declare that a solution exists by restating some form of the thesis and your call to action

 

  1. Tell us what the policy is in quick summary and who supports it

 

  1. Explain what the key elements of the policy are.
    1. Identify a key way the policy will solve the problem(s) identified above.
      1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
      2. Identify a key way the policy will solve the problem(s) identified above.
        1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
      3. Repeat until arguments for the policy-as-solution are addressed in full or as needed.

 

  1. Opposition / Rebuttal
    1. Shift gears and tell us who the opposition is (groups?) and what they’re saying (succinctly)
    2. Rebut their argument – with supporting evidence, not just your opinion

 

Transition: use a signpost to move from body to conclusion

 

 
 

IV            Conclusion

  1. Quick review of thesis (general problem and bill as solution)
  2. Restate your call to action – GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO TAKE THIS ACTION!
  3. Close memorably


POLICY SPEECH – OUTLINE TEMPLATE

Against a Policy

 

 

I               Introduction

A.            Pathos move – capture the attention of the audience by getting us to care about the issue to be                                  introduced in the problem section

B.            Logos move – clarify the subject matter (problem), then state your thesis declaring that a solution                             has been proposed (the bill) and your belief that it is inadequate, including your call to action (what do

you want your audience to DO).

 

Transition : use a signpost to move from intro to body (Ex: Does this mean there’s no problem? Absolutely not.)

 

II             Problem: Name the Problem

 

 
 
    1. Identify an aspect of the problem
  1. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
  2. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  3. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
  4. Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.)
  5. Layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  6. Make an assessment (what does this – the stats, examples, etc. – mean?)
    1. Identify another aspect of the problem
    1.  Make a decision how much evidence to marshal in support of the problem. Keep in mind that the point is to build a solid case that there is a serious problem, while keeping the problems relative to what your bill does (how will it solve those problems)

 

Transition: review previous main point and preview upcoming main point

 

III            Solution: Declare that a solution has been proposed and restate your belief that it is inadequate and your call to action

 

  1. Brief summary what the key elements of the policy are who supports it
    1. Identify key way supporters of the policy believe it will solve the problem(s) identified above.
      1. Offer their supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations, examples, etc.
  2. Brief summary of why this policy will not solve the identified problem(s) and who is against this policy-as-solution

1.     Identify key ways those against this policy-as-solution believe it will not solve the problem(s)                                        identified above.

a.     Offer supporting evidence (statistics, data, etc.) and layer that support with illustrations,          examples, etc.

  1. Repeat until arguments for the policy-as-solution and policy-as-NOT-the-solution are addressed in full or as needed. (The majority of your time should be spent in the “B” section of part “III.”)

 

Transition: use a signpost to move from body to conclusion

 

IV            Conclusion

  1. Quick review of thesis (general problem and bill as NOT the expedient solution)
  2. Restate your call to action – GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE THE TOOLS THEY NEED TO TAKE THIS ACTION!
  3. Close memorably

 

 
 

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